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Music education as a means to enhance the perceived sense of social inclusion and to empower the young through increased employment in Eastern Uganda

Author:

Tiija Rinta Tettey

Institute of Education University of London, GB
About Tiija
Doctor Tiija Rinta is an educationist, researcher and development worker based in London, UK. She is based at the Institute of Education (University of London), working for research projects concerned with music, social science and education. Tiija has worked for several international NGOs, Government Agencies and universities in the above roles. Her recent work has included developing teaching and learning materials for UNICEF, Save the Children and Relief International, as well as carrying out research for the European Union and the UK Government. The products of these projects are publications in international professional journals, articles in magazines and book chapters.
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Abstract

Uganda has a rich culture in music, with musical skills having traditionally been passed down orally from one generation to the next. In school, music as a subject is featured in the National Curriculum; however, its teaching varies widely from school to school. Yet, due to music playing a vital role in the culture, musical activities take place daily and musicians are regularly needed in events. Engaging in musical activities could potentially empower young Ugandans and help them with feeling socially included in their communities. The current study aimed to investigate whether music education could potentially be used as a tool to empower young people through an enhanced sense of social inclusion. In total, 125 locals in the Eastern part of Uganda participated in the study. In the first phase, 125 participants completed a survey and, in the second phase 30 participants were randomly chosen for in-depth interviews. A mixed-method approach was adapted. The findings provide evidence for a much needed enhanced musical training, consequently providing the young with employable skills. The findings further indicate that being musically active in one’s community can potentially enhance feelings of social inclusion and belonging amongst young Ugandans. In the long term, improved music education in schools could result in increased feelings of belonging and wellbeing amongst the young in rural parts of Uganda.
How to Cite: Rinta Tettey, T., 2019. Music education as a means to enhance the perceived sense of social inclusion and to empower the young through increased employment in Eastern Uganda. Journal of Social Inclusion, 10(1), pp.59–77. DOI: http://doi.org/10.36251/josi.163
Published on 13 Sep 2019.
Peer Reviewed

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