Start Submission Become a Reviewer

Reading: Do schools promote social inclusion? The experiences of intercountry adoptees in Australia

Download

A- A+
Alt. Display

Articles

Do schools promote social inclusion? The experiences of intercountry adoptees in Australia

Authors:

Beverly Scarvelis,

Deakin University, AU
X close

Beth Crisp ,

Deakin University, AU
X close

Sophie Goldingay

Deakin University, AU
X close

Abstract

Intercountry adoption programs have brought children from racially and culturally diverse backgrounds to live as Australians, including 30 children from Rangsit Children’s Home who arrived in South Australia in the late 1980s and early 1990s. As part of a project which explored the life experiences of 12 adults who had arrived as children aged between 4 and 9 from Rangsit, this paper explores the role of schools in facilitating their inclusion into life in Australia. The school experience was often critical in learning English and was a pre-requisite for acceptance in the school yard but also a place in which most of these Thai-born intercountry adoptees experienced racism. More than half of the participants did not complete secondary school but all had employment. However, many of these jobs were low-paying and this precluded them from participating in opportunities to return to Thailand to learn more about their Thai origins or participating as adoptive parents in intercountry adoption programs. Hence, while schools can play an important role in facilitating social inclusion, the school system alone may be unable to address the multiple dimensions of exclusion experienced by intercountry adoptees.

How to Cite: Scarvelis, B., Crisp, B. and Goldingay, S., 2014. Do schools promote social inclusion? The experiences of intercountry adoptees in Australia. Journal of Social Inclusion, 5(1), pp.61–77. DOI: http://doi.org/10.36251/josi.69
1292
Views
1235
Downloads
Published on 04 Jun 2014.
Peer Reviewed

Downloads

  • PDF (EN)