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Social play amongst preschool-aged children from an inner and an outer metropolitan suburb

Authors:

Fiona Jane Andrews ,

Senior Lecturer, School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Geelong. Australia., AU
About Fiona
PhD, is a Senior Lecturer at Deakin University, School of Health and Social Development, Co-Leader of the Deakin Research Hub HOME, and member of the Centre for Health through Action on Social Exclusion (CHASE). She has research interests and has published on the relationship between neighbourhoods, health and families, with a particular focus on parents of preschool-aged children. She lectures in healthy cities; family health and well-being; health, place and planning.
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Karen Stagnitti,

Emeritus Professor, , School of Health and Social Development, Locked Bag 20001, Deakin University, Geelong. Australia, AU
About Karen
Emeritus Professor,  School of Health and Social Development, Locked Bag 20001, Deakin University, Geelong. Australia
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Narelle Robertson

Research Assistant, School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Locked Bag 20001, Geelong. Australia, AU
About Narelle
Research Assistant, School of Health and Social Development, Deakin University, Locked Bag 20001, Geelong. Australia
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Abstract

Play is essential for healthy child development. While, the relationship between neighbourhood and young children’s physical activity is well reported in the literature, less is known about preschool children’s social play in different suburban settings. This study took a mixed methods approach. Seventy-two parents from an inner-suburb and 26 parents from an outer-suburb in a metropolitan city in Australia returned a survey on: who their preschool age children played with and where their children played. Twenty parents also consented to a follow up open-ended interview. Children from the inner-suburb played more with non-related children (p < 0.05) and in a wider range of formal and informal settings than children from the outer-suburbs. Neighbourhood, family and planning policy contributed to the differences in child socialisation and these were mapped using Bronfenbrenner’s Social Ecology model. Findings have implications for both service providers and policy makers in suburban settings.
How to Cite: Andrews, F.J., Stagnitti, K. and Robertson, N., 2019. Social play amongst preschool-aged children from an inner and an outer metropolitan suburb. Journal of Social Inclusion, 10(2), pp.4–17.
Published on 20 Dec 2019.
Peer Reviewed

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